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​Curriculum Standards

This Lesson is Standards Aligned

It has been designed to meet certain national history, social studies, civics and government, and Common Core standards as defined by the National Center for History in the Schools, the National Council for the Social Studies, the Center for Civic Education, and the Common Core State Standards Initiative. The standards for the lesson are listed here.

Reading Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies
(from the Common Core State Standards Initiative)

  • Standard 2, Grades 9–10: Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of how key events or ideas develop over the course of the text.
     

  • Standard 2, Grades 11–12: Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among the key details and ideas.
     

  • Standard 3, Grades 9–10: Analyze in detail a series of events described in a text; determine whether earlier events caused later ones or simply preceded them.
     

  • Standard 3, Grades 11–12: Evaluate various explanations for actions or events and determine which explanation best accords with textual evidence, acknowledging where the text leaves matters uncertain.
     

  • Standard 7, Grades 9–10: Integrate quantitative or technical analysis (e.g., charts, research data) with qualitative analysis in print or digital text.
     

  • Standard 7, Grades 11–12: Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, as well as in words) in order to address a question or solve a problem.
     

  • Standard 9, Grades 11–12: Integrate information from diverse sources, both primary and secondary, into a coherent understanding of an idea or event, noting discrepancies among sources.

Writing Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects
(from the Common Core State Standards Initiative)

  • Standard 1, Grades 9–10, 11–12: Write arguments focused on discipline-specific content.
     

  • Standard 2, Grades 9–10, 11–12: Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/experiments, or technical processes.
     

  • Standard 7, Grades 9–10, 11–12: Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
     

  • Standard 9, Grades 9–10, 11–12: Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

National Standards for Civics and Government
(from the Center for Civic Education)

  • Standard II: What are the Foundations of the American Political System?

    • (A) What is the American idea of constitutional government?

    • (D) What values and principles are basic to American constitutional democracy?
       

  • Standard V: What are the Roles of the Citizen in American Democracy?

    • (D) What civic dispositions or traits of private and public character are important to the preservation and improvement of American constitutional democracy?

    • (E) How can citizens take part in civic life?

National Social Studies Standards
(from the National Council for the Social Studies)

  • Culture; Thematic Strand I: Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of culture and cultural diversity.
     

  • Time, Continuity, and Change; Thematic Strand II: Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of the past and its legacy.
     

  • Individuals, Groups, and Institutions; Thematic Strand V: Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of interactions among individuals, groups, and institutions.
     

  • Power, Authority, and Governance; Thematic Strand VI: Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of how people create, interact with, and change structures of power, authority, and governance.
     

  • Civic Ideals and Practices; Thematic Strand X: Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of the ideals, principles, and practices of citizenship in a democratic republic.

National History Standards
(from the National Center for History in the Schools) 

Era 8, Standard 5A: The student understands major global trends from 1900 to the end of World War II.

  • Grades 7–12: Identify patterns of social and cultural continuity in various societies, and analyze ways in which peoples maintained traditions, sustained basic loyalties, and resisted external challenges in this era of recurrent world crises. [Explain historical continuity and change]
     

Era 9, Standard 2C: The student understands how liberal democracy, market economies, and human rights movements have reshaped political and social life.

  • Grades 5–12: Assess the progress of human and civil rights around the world since the 1948 U.N. Declaration of Human Rights. [Formulate a position or course of action on an issue]

World History

Era 4, Standard 1C: The student understands the ideology of Manifest Destiny, the nation’s expansion to the Northwest, and the Mexican-American War.

  • Grades 9–12: Analyze United States trading interests in the Far East and explain how they influenced continental expansion to the Pacific. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]

 

Era 4, Standard 2C: The student understands how antebellum immigration changed American society.

  • Grades 7–12: Explain how immigration intensified ethnic and cultural conflict and complicated the forging of a national identity. [Interrogate historical data]

 

Era 8, Standard 3A: The student understands the international background of World War II.

  • Grades 7–12: Analyze the reasons for the growing tensions with Japan in East Asia culminating with the bombing of Pearl Harbor. [Marshal evidence of antecedent circumstances]

 

Era 8, Standard 3B: The student understands World War II and how the Allies prevailed.

  • Grades 5–12: Explain the financial, material, and human costs of the war and analyze its economic consequences for the Allies and the Axis powers. [Utilize visual and quantitative data]

Era 8, Standard 3C: The student understands the effects of World War II at home.

  • Grades 5–12: Evaluate the internment of Japanese Americans during the war and assess the implication for civil liberties. [Evaluate the implementation of a decision]

U.S. History

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