Center Gradient Transparent

​Materials & Teacher Preparation

Get everything you need to start teaching today.

In this download center you can access, download or print copies of handouts, activities, and discussion-related materials you will need to make this lesson a success. We recommend the following class preparation.

Equipment

  • Computer with Internet access for teacher 

  • Computers with Internet access for students (throughout, or just for student research on Days One and Two) 

  • Computer projector 

  • Speakers 

 

Teacher Preparation

Follow the instructions below before starting this lesson.

  1. If teaching this lesson using print materials, make the appropriate number of copies of all student materials. (Quantities listed below.)  

  2. Set up and test computer, projector, speakers, and all videos before starting the lesson. Confirm that you are able to play and project the videos with adequate audio volume, or that your students can on their own systems. 

  3. Before Days One and Two, or for all days if you are using online versions of materials, ensure that computers are available for in-class student use.

Students learn about the history of U.S.–Japan relations by reading a general overview, “Relations Between Japan and the United States, 1853–2018,” which was written by Stanford Professor Emeritus (History) Peter Duus. They then work in groups to conduct research on one of six facets of contemporary U.S.–Japan relations.

Materials

Days One & Two

Commodore_Matthew_Calbraith_Perry.png

Materials

CLOSE-UP
Have students read and discuss this in-depth article on the history of U.S.–Japan relations.

Teacher Information 

Student Handout

one copy per student

Each student group presents its research on one of six different facets of contemporary U.S.–Japan relations. They then view video vignettes about two prominent individuals who have served as bridges between the United States and Japan—former U.S. Ambassador to Japan, John Roos, and former Secretary of Transportation and Commerce, Norman Mineta—as examples of influential leaders in the U.S.–Japan relationship.

Materials

Day Three

WATCH
Students hear from former U.S. Ambassador to Japan John Roos about U.S.–Japan relations.

Student Handout

one copy per student (optional)

Teacher Information 

Video: U.S.–Japan Relations: Behind the Scenes

Materials

blur-close-up-focus-574285.jpg

Materials

Teacher Information 

one copy per student

Student Handout

ASSIGNMENT
WATCH
Students follow Secretary Mineta to Japan as he navigates the land of his ancestry with the land of his birth.

Student Handout

one copy per student (optional)

Teacher Information 

Video: Bridging Two Countries: Norman Y. Mineta

Materials

Woman holding a speech bubble.jpg

Student Handout

six copies (optional)

U.S.–Japan Notepad

one copy per student

Materials

Teacher Information 

ACTIVITY
Have students present their research on different facets of the U.S.–Japan relationship.

Students view video comments by young Americans who have become involved in the U.S.–Japan relationship in some form. After reflecting on the methods and possible value of being involved in U.S.–Japan relations, students broaden their thinking and consider how they might be able to serve as bridges between different communities in their own city or school.

Materials

Day Four

Building%20Bridges%20for%20Tomorrow%20v1
WATCH
Students hear other students discuss their role in U.S.–Japan relations.

Student Handout

one copy per student (optional)

Teacher Information 

Video: Building Bridges for Tomorrow

Materials

US and Japanese passport on a wooden des

Facet: Military Alliance

one copy

Facet: Educational Exchange

one copy

Facet: Trade

one copy

Facet: Politics

one copy

Facet: Culture

one copy

Facet: People Exchange

one copy

Materials

Teacher Information 

ACTIVITY
Student groups review and research different facets of the U.S.–Japan relationship.

Materials

Teacher Information 

ACTIVITY
Lead a class discussion on this question in light of the four videos viewed during this lesson.

one copy per student (optional)

Student Handout

Earth at night was holding in human hand

Materials

Teacher Information 

ACTIVITY
Students consider how individuals can serve as bridges of understanding between communities.

Student Handout

one copy per student

Building Global Bridges v32.mp4square.jp
WATCH
Students watch a case study of one American student who has worked to build bridges between different kinds of communities.

Student Handout

one copy per student (optional)

Teacher Information 

Video: Building Global Bridges

Materials

Sign up for updates & stay connected.

arrow&v
arrow&v
  • Grey Instagram Icon
  • Grey Facebook Icon
  • Grey Twitter Icon
  • YouTube

Major Funding Provided By

© 2020 Media Bridges, Inc. & SPICE

Website created by Multiply Bureau