Recap: Civically Engaged Americans

Let's Recap What We've Learned

Present your findings of the civically engaged American you researched, then reflect on what you’ve learned.

Introduction

You’ve just learned about several civically engaged Americans who impacted democracy in the United States. Reflect on these case studies while discussing the points below.

Has your understanding of civic engagement changed as a result of learning about one or more of the people in this activity? If so, how?


 

How do you think modern U.S. society would be different if one, two, or all five of these people had not become civically active?

Civil Rights March on Washington, D.C.,

August 28, 1963.

Although the subjects of your research are not particularly famous, their civic involvement eventually effected large-scale changes in American laws, institutions, and culture.

But an important thing to recognize is that all of them started by acting locally—in their own city, community, or place of work.

Think of the communities you are a part of—your school, neighborhood, city, etc.

What are some issues or needs in these communities?


How might students like you help address these issues/needs and “promote the quality of life in [your] community”?

What challenges might you face?

 

What help, resources, or strategies might you be able to leverage to overcome these challenges?

Next Up:

CIVICALLY ENGAGED STUDENTS

WATCH

Hear from students about how they have become civically active.

WHY I CARE: A STUDENT ACTIVIST’S PERSPECTIVE

WATCH

Watch a short profile of student activist Michelle Hua.

REFLECTING ON CIVIC ENGAGEMENT

ASSIGNMENT

Reflect on the ways you could envision becoming more involved in your community.

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