Gallery Walk of the Japanese American Incarceration

Take a Digital Tour

Study the Japanese American incarceration in more depth by examining collections of primary source documents. Explore all seven exhibits and take notes for reflection.

Gallery Exhibits:
Exhibit B
Exhibit B
Map of Prison Camps
Exhibit A
Exclusion_Order_posted_at_First_and_Fron
Exhibit A

Eviction Poster

Exhibit C
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Photos of the Forced Removal
Exhibit C
Photos of Life in the Prison Camps
Exhibit D
Exhibit D
Exhibit G
Leave-Related Documents
Exhibit G
Exhibit F
Exhibit F
Memorandum from Delos Emmons
Exhibit E
Exhibit E
Front Page of the Heart Mountain Sentinel

Introduction
Learn more about the Japanese American incarceration through a gallery walk activity. Examine all seven exhibits, responding to the prompts at the bottom of each exhibit.

Note that in many of the captioned photos, there will be quotation marks placed around out-of-date terminology that was used during that time.

 
Gallery Exhibit A:
Eviction Poster in San Francisco

Context

On February 19, 1942, President Franklin Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, which authorized the government to designate military areas “from which any or all persons may be excluded.”

 

Two weeks later, Army General John DeWitt designated the West Coast as a military exclusion area.¹

Soon thereafter, eviction posters began appearing in neighborhoods across the West Coast. These posters informed the local Japanese residents that they would be evicted from their homes and gave them specific instructions on what they needed to do in the days ahead.

 

The poster you are about to examine appeared in a neighborhood in San Francisco, California.

 

EVICTION POSTER.jpg