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​Curriculum Standards

This Lesson is Standards Aligned

It has been designed to meet certain national history, social studies, civics and government, and Common Core standards as defined by the National Center for History in the Schools, the National Council for the Social Studies, the Center for Civic Education, and the Common Core State Standards Initiative. The standards for the lesson are listed here.

National Social Studies Standards
(from the National Council for the Social Studies)

  • Time, Continuity, and Change; Thematic Strand II: Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of the past and its legacy.
     

  • Individual Development and Identity; Thematic Strand IV: Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of individual development and identity.
     

  • Individuals, Groups, and Institutions; Thematic Strand V: Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of interactions among individuals, groups, and institutions.
     

  • Power, Authority, and Governance; Thematic Strand VI: Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of how people create, interact with, and change structures of power, authority, and governance.
     

  • Civic Ideals and Practices; Thematic Strand X: Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of the ideals, principles, and practices of citizenship in a democratic republic.

National Standards for Civics and Government
(from the Center for Civic Education)

  • Standard I: What are Civic Life, Politics, and Government?

    • (A) What is civic life? What is politics? What is government? Why are government and politics necessary? What purposes should government serve?
       

  • Standard III: How Does the Government Established by the Constitution Embody the Purposes, Values, and Principles of American Democracy?

    • (A) How are power and responsibility distributed, shared, and limited in the government established by the United States Constitution?

    • (B) How is the national government organized and what does it do?

    • (D) What is the place of law in the American constitutional system?

    • (E) How does the American political system provide for choice and opportunities for participation?
       

  • Standard V: What are the Roles of the Citizen in American Democracy?

    • (A) What is citizenship?

    • (B) What are the rights of citizens?

    • (C) What are the responsibilities of citizens?

    • (D) What civic dispositions or traits of private and public character are important to the preservation and improvement of American constitutional democracy?

    • (E) How can citizens take part in civic life?

Writing Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects

(from the Common Core State Standards Initiative)

  • Standard 1, Grades 9–10, 11–12: Write arguments focused on discipline-specific content.
     

  • Standard 2, Grades 9–10, 11–12: Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/experiments, or technical processes.
     

  • Standard 4, Grades 9–10, 11–12: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
     

  • Standard 7, Grades 9–10, 11–12: Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
     

  • Standard 8, Grades 9–10: Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation.
     

  • Standard 8, Grades 11–12: Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in terms of the specific task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation.
     

  • Standard 9, Grades 9–10, 11–12: Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

National History Standards

(from the National Center for History in the Schools) 

Era 9, Standard 4A: The student understands the “Second Reconstruction” and its advancement of civil rights.

  • Grades 5–12: Evaluate the agendas, strategies, and effectiveness of various African Americans, Asian Americans, Latino Americans, and Native Americans, as well as the disabled, in the quest for civil rights and equal opportunities. [Explain historical continuity and change]
     

Era 10, Standard 2E: The student understands how a democratic polity debates social issues and mediates between individual or group rights and the common good.

  • Grades 7–12: Evaluate the continuing grievances of racial and ethnic minorities and their recurrent reference to the nation’s charter documents. [Explain historical continuity and change]
    Grades 9–12: Examine the emergence of the Gay Liberation Movement and evaluate the invocation of democratic ideals concerning the civil rights of gay Americans. [Consider multiple perspectives]
    Grades 9–12: Evaluate the continuing struggle for e pluribus unum amid debates over national vs. group identity, group rights vs. individual rights, multiculturalism, and bilingual education. [Consider multiple perspectives]

U.S. History

Era 9, Standard 2C: The student understands how liberal democracy, market economies, and human rights movements have reshaped political and social life.

  • Grades 5–12: Assess the progress of human and civil rights around the world since the 1948 U.N. Declaration of Human Rights. [Formulate a position or course of action on an issue]

World History

  • Standard 1, Grades 9–10: Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, attending to such features as the date and origin of the information.
     

  • Standard 1, Grades 11–12: Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole.
     

  • Standard 2, Grades 9–10: Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of how key events or ideas develop over the course of the text.
     

  • Standard 2, Grades 11–12: Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among the key details and ideas.
     

  • Standard 9, Grades 11–12: Integrate information from diverse sources, both primary and secondary, into a coherent understanding of an idea or event, noting discrepancies among sources.

Reading Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies
(from the Common Core State Standards Initiative)

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