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​Curriculum Standards

This Lesson is Standards Aligned

It has been designed to meet certain national history, social studies, civics and government, and Common Core standards as defined by the National Center for History in the Schools, the National Council for the Social Studies, the Center for Civic Education, and the Common Core State Standards Initiative. The standards for the lesson are listed here.

National History Standards
(from the National Center for History in the Schools) 

U.S. History

Era 6, Standard 1C: The student understands how agriculture, mining, and ranching were transformed.

  • Grades 7–12: Explain the gender composition and ethnic diversity of farmers, miners, and ranchers and analyze how this affected the development of the West. [Examine the influence of ideas]
     

Era 6, Standard 2A: The student understands the sources and experiences of the new immigrants.

  • Grades 7–12: Distinguish between the “old” and “new” immigration in terms of its volume and the immigrants’ ethnicity, religion, language, place of origin, and motives for emigrating from their homelands. [Analyze multiple causation]

  • Grades 5–12: Trace patterns of immigrant settlement in different regions of the country and how new immigrants helped produce a composite American culture that transcended group boundaries. [Reconstruct patterns of historical succession and duration]

  • Grades 5–12: Assess the challenges, opportunities, and contributions of different immigrant groups. [Examine historical perspectives]

  • Grades 7–12: Evaluate how Catholic and Jewish immigrants responded to religious discrimination. [Obtain historical data]
     

Era 6, Standard 2B: The student understands “scientific racism,” race relations, and the struggle for equal rights.

  • Grades 5–12: Explain the rising racial conflict in different regions, including the anti-Chinese movement in the West and the rise of lynching in the South. [Explain historical continuity and change]

  • Grades 9–12: Analyze the role of new laws and the federal judiciary in instituting racial inequality and in disfranchising various racial groups. [Evaluate the implementation of a decision]

  • Grades 9–12: Analyze the arguments and methods by which various minority groups sought to acquire equal rights and opportunities guaranteed in the nation’s charter documents. [Identify issues and problems in the past]
     

Era 6, Standard 3A: The student understands how the “second industrial revolution” changed the nature and conditions of work.

  • Grades 9–12: Account for employment in different regions of the country as affected by gender, race, ethnicity, and skill. [Formulate historical questions]
     

Era 7, Standard 2A: The student understands how the American role in the world changed in the early 20th century.

  • Grades 7–12: Explain relations with Japan and the significance of the “Gentleman’s Agreement.” [Consider multiple perspectives]
     

Era 7, Standard 3A: The student understands social tensions and their consequences in the postwar era.

  • Grades 5–12: Analyze the factors that lead to immigration restriction and the closing of the “Golden Door.” [Interrogate historical data]

  • Grades 7–12: Examine rising racial tensions, the resurgence of the Ku Klux Klan, and the emergence of Garveyism. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]
     

Era 8, Standard 3C: The student understands the effects of World War II at home.

  • Grades 7–12: Explore how the war fostered cultural exchange and interaction while promoting nationalism and American identity. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]

  • Grades 7–12: Evaluate how minorities organized to gain access to wartime jobs and how they confronted discrimination. [Formulate a position or course of action on an issue]

  • Grades 5–12: Evaluate the internment of Japanese Americans during the war and assess the implication for civil liberties. [Evaluate the implementation of a decision]
     

Era 9, Standard 4A: The student understands the “Second Reconstruction” and its advancement of civil rights.

  • Grades 5–12: Evaluate the agendas, strategies, and effectiveness of various African Americans, Asian Americans, Latino Americans, and Native Americans, as well as the disabled, in the quest for civil rights and equal opportunities. [Explain historical continuity and change]
     

Era 9, Standard 4C: The student understands the Warren Court’s role in addressing civil liberties and equal rights.

  • Grades 9–12: Assess the effectiveness of the judiciary as opposed to the legislative and executive branches of government in promoting civil liberties and equal opportunities. [Challenge arguments of historical inevitability]
     

Era 10, Standard 2A: The student understands economic patterns since 1968.

  • Grades 7–12: Analyze the economic and social effects of the sharp increase in the labor force participation of women and new immigrants. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]
     

Era 10, Standard 2B: The student understands the new immigration and demographic shifts.

  • Grades 5–12: Analyze the new immigration policies after 1965 and the push-pull factors that prompted a new wave of immigrants. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]

  • Grades 9–12: Identify the major issues that affected immigrants and explain the conflicts these issues engendered. [Identify issues and problems in the past]
     

Era 10, Standard 2E: The student understands how a democratic polity debates social issues and mediates between individual or group rights and the common good.

  • Grades 7–12: Evaluate the continuing grievances of racial and ethnic minorities and their recurrent reference to the nation’s charter documents. [Explain historical continuity and change]

  • Grades 9–12: Evaluate the continuing struggle for e pluribus unum amid debates over national vs. group identity, group rights vs. individual rights, multiculturalism, and bilingual education. [Consider multiple perspectives]


 

Era 8, Standard 5A: The student understands major global trends from 1900 to the end of World War II.

  • Grades 7–12: Identify patterns of social and cultural continuity in various societies, and analyze ways in which peoples maintained traditions, sustained basic loyalties, and resisted external challenges in this era of recurrent world crises. [Explain historical continuity and change]

World History

National Social Studies Standards
(from the National Council for the Social Studies)

  • Time, Continuity, and Change; Thematic Strand II: Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of the past and its legacy.
     

  • People, Places, and Environments; Thematic Strand III: Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of people, places, and environments.
     

  • Individual Development and Identity; Thematic Strand IV: Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of individual development and identity.
     

  • Power, Authority, and Governance; Thematic Strand VI: Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of how people create, interact with, and change structures of power, authority, and governance.
     

  • Global Connections; Thematic Strand IX: Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of global connections and interdependence.
     

  • Civic Ideals and Practices; Thematic Strand X: Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of the ideals, principles, and practices of citizenship in a democratic republic.

National Standards for Civics and Government
(from the Center for Civic Education)

  • Standard IV: What is the Relationship of the United States to Other Nations and to World Affairs?

    • (B) How do the domestic politics and constitutional principles of the United States affect its relations with the world?

    • (C) How has the United States influenced other nations, and how have other nations influenced American politics and society?
       

  • Standard V: What are the Roles of the Citizen in American Democracy?

    • (A) What is citizenship?

Reading Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies
(from the Common Core State Standards Initiative)

  • Standard 1, Grades 9–10: Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, attending to such features as the date and origin of the information.
     

  • Standard 1, Grades 11–12: Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole.
     

  • Standard 2, Grades 9–10: Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of how key events or ideas develop over the course of the text.
     

  • Standard 2, Grades 11–12: Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among the key details and ideas.
     

  • Standard 5, Grades 9–10: Analyze how a text uses structure to emphasize key points or advance an explanation or analysis.
     

  • Standard 6, Grades 9–10: Compare the point of view of two or more authors for how they treat the same or similar topics, including which details they include and emphasize in their respective accounts.
     

  • Standard 6, Grades 11–12: Evaluate authors’ differing points of view on the same historical event or issue by assessing the authors’ claims, reasoning, and evidence.
     

  • Standard 7, Grades 9–10: Integrate quantitative or technical analysis (e.g., charts, research data) with qualitative analysis in print or digital text.
     

  • Standard 7, Grades 11–12: Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, as well as in words) in order to address a question or solve a problem.
     

  • Standard 8, Grades 9–10: Assess the extent to which the reasoning and evidence in a text support the author’s claims.
     

  • Standard 8, Grades 11–12: Evaluate an author’s premises, claims, and evidence by corroborating or challenging them with other information.
     

  • Standard 9, Grades 9–10: Compare and contrast treatments of the same topic in several primary and secondary sources.
     

  • Standard 9, Grades 11–12: Integrate information from diverse sources, both primary and secondary, into a coherent understanding of an idea or event, noting discrepancies among sources.

Writing Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects
(from the Common Core State Standards Initiative)

  • Standard 1, Grades 9–10, 11–12: Write arguments focused on discipline-specific content.
     

  • Standard 2, Grades 9–10, 11–12: Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/experiments, or technical processes.
     

  • Standard 4, Grades 9–10, 11–12: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
     

  • Standard 7, Grades 9–10, 11–12: Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
     

  • Standard 8, Grades 9–10: Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation.
     

  • Standard 8, Grades 11–12: Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in terms of the specific task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation.
     

  • Standard 9, Grades 9–10, 11–12: Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

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